Top

Brands

  • DVD Reader/Writer
  • Extended Capacity Batteries
  • iPodWizards
  • MacCharger
  • Video Connect
  • Wireless Extenders

Video Adapters Guide

Thunderbolt Port
Thunderbolt™
The Thunderbolt port was introduced in February 2011 and appears on many of the new Apple laptop computers. It was originally code named Light Peak and developed by Intel, although the trademark and technology are now owned by Apple.

The Thunderbolt is a hybrid interface using the mini-DisplayPort connector. The distinction between Thunderbolt and a simple mini-Display Port is that Thunderbolt combines both the functionality of mini-DisplayPort for video and PCI Express for other data. Since it is just mini-DisplayPort with added features, mini-DisplayPort adapters and devices are entirely compatible with Thunderbolt.

A single Thunderbolt port supports hubs as well as a daisy chain of up to seven Thunderbolt devices (up to two of these devices may be displays using DisplayPort). With the correct mini-DisplayPort adapter, Thunderbolt computers can drive DVI, dual-link DVI, VGA, or HDMI displays.

Since the exterior port is the same for Thunderbolt and mini-DisplayPort the only way to distinguish between Thunderbolt computers and mini-DisplayPort only ones is by the Thunderbolt icon that appears next to the port.

The addition of a PCI Express interface in Thunderbolt means the Thunderbolt port can also be used to drive hard drives, scanners, network interface cards, cameras and potentially many other types of device.
Adapter for:
Thunderbolt (mini-DisplayPort) Mac to DVI Display
Mini DisplayPort to DVI
Adapter for:
Thunderbolt (mini-DisplayPort) Mac to HDMI Display
Mini DisplayPort to HDMI
 
Mini DisplayPort
mini-DisplayPort™
The mini-DisplayPort was introduced in October 2008 and is the current Apple standard for video on laptop computers.

This connector is used in revisions of the MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro notebooks, iMac, Mac Mini, and Mac Pro desktops and also the 24-inch Apple Cinema Display released since October 2008.

With the correct adapter, mini-DisplayPort computers can drive DVI, VGA, or HDMI displays.
Adapter for:
mini-DisplayPort Mac to DVI Display
Mini DisplayPort to DVI
Adapter for:
mini-DisplayPort Mac to HDMI Display
Mini DisplayPort to HDMI
 
Mini DVI

mini-DVI
The mini-DVI connector was used in select Apple portable computers between 2003 and 2008, where the computer required a smaller video out port than standard DVI.

It is found on the 12-inch PowerBook G4, Intel-based iMac, the MacBook Intel-based laptop, the Intel-based Xserve, and the 2009 Mac mini.

With the correct adapter, mini-DVI computers can drive DVI, VGA, or HDMI displays.
Adapter for:
mini-DVI Mac to DVI Display
mini-DVI to DVI
Adapter for:
mini-DVI Mac to VGA Display
Mini-DVI to VGA
 
Micro DVI

micro-DVI
The Micro-DVI port is a video connection port used by some Apple MacBook Air laptop computers produced between January-October 2008.

The micro-DVI connector was used only on early MacBook Air computers (no other Macintosh portable used this connector).

With the correct adapter, mini-DVI computers can drive DVI, VGA, or HDMI displays. Currently MacWizards does not offer adapters for this port.
 
mini-VGA

mini-VGA
The mini-VGA connector was used on select Apple laptops around 2003.

Mini-VGA connectors are most commonly seen on Apple's iBooks, eMacs, early PowerBooks (12 inch), and some iMacs, but has also been included on several laptops manufactured by Sony.

Mini-VGA computers can drive VGA monitors. This connector also allows S-VIDEO out. Currently MacWizards does not offer adapters for this port.
 
DVI

DVI (digital video interface)
DVI is a digital video connection used by LCD (flat panel) monitors and many Apple desktop and laptop computers. Apple used DVI on their portable computers from Octobter 2001 through 2005.

DVI connectors are found on some G3 and most G4 PowerBook computers with the notable exception of the 12" PowerBook (which used a mini-DVI connector).

There are two sub-types of DVI out -- DVI-D and DVI-I -- that impact some Mac users. Most Apple computers are DVI-I (integrated analog and digital) and can can drive DVI, VGA, or HDMI displays. However some computers (for Mac users, this is only the DVI-D adapter that Apple shipped with the MacBook Air) are DVI-D (digital only) and cannot connect to VGA displays.
Adapter for:
DVI Mac to VGA Display
DVI to VGA
Adapter for:
mini-DisplayPort Mac to DVI Display
Mini DisplayPort to DVI
Adapter for:
mini-DVI Mac to DVI Display
mini-DVI to DVI
 
VGA

VGA (HD-15)
VGA port is an analog video connection used by CRT monitors and older computers. Apple laptop computers discontinued using VGA ports (also called HD-15 ports) in October 2001.

VGA was used as video out in the G3 PowerBooks and early G4 PowerBooks and many Apple desktop and CRT monitors.

VGA computers can drive VGA monitors. Many DVI monitors have a VGA to DVI converter built into them (in addition to their normal DVI port) to support older computers that do not generate digital video. If you want to drive a flat panel (digital) display with an older VGA Mac, look on your monitor for that additional VGA port. If you find the VGA port, you don't need an adapter. If you don't find it you may need to buy a DVI video card or consider upgrading the computer.
Adapter for:
DVI Mac to VGA Display
DVI to VGA
Adapter for:
mini-DVI Mac to VGA Display
Mini-DVI to VGA
Continue